How to Get Started With Hand Embroidery

Learning embroidery doesn't have to be difficult, and It's actually an easy and inexpensive hobby to jump into.

For your first project, choose a light-colored quilting cotton or a linen. Select a few colors of cotton embroidery floss. DMC brand is easy to find, inexpensive and good quality. There are many styles of embroidery hoops available, but all you need to get started is a basic wooden or plastic hoop. A 6-inch hoop will serve you well. Select any sharp needle with an eye large enough to thread embroidery floss through.

Next step is to choose a design that you want to embroider. It’s a good idea to stick to something as basic as possible. Go for clean lines, not too much area to be filled, and larger shapes. You can find designs online or you can draw it on your own.

You can mark or transfer an embroidery design on fabric in a variety of ways, but the easiest way to transfer embroidery pattern is with carbon paper. Use a light-colored piece of carbon paper to mark designs on darker fabrics, and a darker color on lighter fabrics. Once you've transferred your design onto fabric, place your fabric into an embroidery hoop.

If you want to know how to transfer embroidery pattern on the easiest way, you can watch a tutorial on my YouTube channel.


Basic Embroidery Stitches – Part 1

These are most basic of all embroidery stitches:

Stem stitch - This stitch creates a thin line and can be used to outline embroidered shapes, to form flower and plant stems and more. It's a nice option for anything that needs to curve. In stem stitch each stitch overlaps the previous stitch to one side, forming a twisted line of stitching, with the thread passing below the needle.

Back stitch - The backstitch is great when you need a solid line, like for certain outlines or text. Begin by pulling the needle up through the fabric and do one stitch forward. From underneath, space the needle out the length of your desired stitch, pull up through the fabric, and bring the needle and floss back down through the end of the previous stitch.

Split stitch - Similar to the back stitch, the split stitch creates a solid line. Begin by pulling the needle up through the fabric and do one stitch forward. From underneath, space the needle out the length of your desired stitch, pull up through the fabric, and bring the needle and floss back down through the center of the previous stitch. For text use small spaces so you can easily embroider letters with curves.

Chain stitch - It's great for an outline or the frame around a patterned design. Pull your needle and floss up through the fabric, then insert it going down right beside where you first inserted it. Don't pull the floss all the way through the fabric; allow it to form a loop. Bring the needle up through that loop in order to tether it from being pulled all the way through the fabric and pull. To make the next chain stitch, place the needle either directly in the hole you just stitched, or close to it, and pull through to create another loop. Again, don't pull the floss completely through the fabric. Pull the needle up through the loop to tether it and pull.

Repeat the steps to continue the chain. When you reach the end of the chain, simply create a small stitch over the loop to secure it.


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  • Diana on

    Love to learn more. But had one question how does the final product look like from the back ?

  • agen poker on

    naturally like your web site however you need to check the spelling on several of your posts.
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  • Fairoza on

    I would love to learn all the stitches

  • Judy Spencer on

    Very well explained, keep it up!

  • Meenakshi Nagar on

    I want to learn all stitches


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